News

Video Archive: NVIDIA GPU Computing and SUrge

April 13, 2022

Brad Palmer
NVIDIA Senior Solutions Architect Brad Palmer

NVIDIA Senior Solutions Architect Brad Palmer along with the Research Computing team discuss how faculty and student researchers can get the most out of their GPU resources.

Hosted by the ITS Research Computing team, the Research Computing Series provides a forum for faculty and students to learn how to move their work forward by using a wide range of tools available to them—including the SUrge graphics processor unit (GPU) cluster.

SUrge provides a significant speed increase over traditional CPUs for a variety of uses, including mathematical operations, rendering, photogrammetry and more. SUrge features more than 300 GPUs, including several NVIDIA models.

Video Archive

GPU Accelerated Applications Catalog

HPC Application Benchmark Performance

GPU Accelerated Libraries

Example implementations of GPU accelerated libraries

OpenACC Acceleration

GPU Hackathons and Bootcamps

CUDA Programming Blog

GPU Acceleration with Standard C Blog

GPU Acceleration with Standard Fortran Blog

Alpha release of cuNumeric Blog

Numba

CuPy

cuNumeric

RAPIDS

RAPIDS cuML supported algorithms

NVIDIA Developer Website

NVIDIA Training

Rising Star Congratulated by the American Chemical Society

Professor Shikha Nangia
Professor Shikha Nangia

Biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Shikha Nangia has been selected as a recipient of the American Chemical Society’s Women Chemist Committee  2022 Rising Star Award. She and her research group are simulating the blood-brain barrier interface in silico (on a computer) using Syracuse University’s advanced computing resources.

SU News story

Scientia’s article on Professor Nangia’s blood-brain research

Bioengineering Ph.D. Student Receives National Recognition for Breakthrough Molecular Computational Tool

Nandhini Rajagopal’s accomplishments are massive even though her research focuses on small molecules

As part of biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Shikha Nangia’s research group, the Ph.D. student has focused her work on minute interactions between protein molecules in the biological cells that make up all living things. Rajagopal’s work is entirely computational and as part of her research she developed a new algorithm that could determine how two different protein molecules would interact.

Nandhini Rajagopal
Nandhini Rajagopal is part of Professor Shikha Nangia’s biomedical and chemical engineering research group.

Spring 2021 Research Computing Series

Do you need more computing power to move your work forward? Attend the Research Computing Series to learn how you can leverage Syracuse University’s advanced computing resources.

Fall 2020 Research Computing Series

Do you need more computing power to move your work forward? Attend the Research Computing Series to learn how you can leverage Syracuse University’s advanced computing resources.

National Science Foundation Awards $390,000 to Research Computing Initiative

September 3, 2020

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a grant of $390,000 for a new research computing cluster at Syracuse University. The cluster will be built using graphical processing units (GPUs), which offer significant processing and memory advantages over traditional hardware. The new cluster will significantly increase the computing power available to faculty and students.

Continue Reading

Fast Forward: Rajagopal’s Award-Winning Research Capitalizes on Private Cloud Resources

Nandhini Rajagopal

Groundbreaking research takes time.

Research computing resources at Syracuse University help speed up the clock.

Nandhini Rajagopal is a biomedical and chemical engineering doctoral student in Professor Shikha Nangia’s lab in the College of Engineering and Computer Science. Last month, Rajagopal won the American Chemical Society’s Chemical Computing Group Research Excellence Award, which recognizes outstanding computational chemistry research conducted by graduate students. Continue Reading

Computing for a Cure

Through the Orange Grid distributed computing system and the Crush research cloud, University computers are contributing to COVID-19 research through such collaborative efforts as the Open Science Grid (OSG), Folding@Home and Rosetta@Home.